Solace

With “Solace,” I am telling a story missing from the current landscape of cinema: Black teenagers dealing with disordered eating and self-harm. The film is about a 17 year-old orphan who is shipped off from New York to live with her estranged grandmother in Los Angeles. After struggling to navigate between her grandmother’s overbearing ways while living with a hidden eating disorder, she plots an escape with her rebellious teenage neighbors, one of whom she learns has a dark secret too: cutting. Despite being widely considered a white girl’s disease, eating disorders are something that acutely affects Black folks; this significant misrepresentation can be accredited to many of us feeling alone in the experience. Black teenagers are 50 percent more likely than white teenagers to exhibit bulimic behavior, such as binging and purging.

READ: Guest Post: How I Sought to Improve Black Representation with My First Feature “Solace” | Women and Hollywood

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absolute power depends on absolute control over knowledge, which in turn necessitates absolute corruption

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“Politicians, Priests, and psychiatrists often face the same problem: how to find the most rapid and permanent means of changing a man’s belief…The problem of the doctor and his nervously ill patient, and that of the religious leader who sets out to gain and hold new converts, has now become the problem of whole groups of nations, who wish not only to confirm certain political beliefs within their boundaries, but to proselytize the outside world.” – William Sargant “Battle of the Mind”

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