Photographic Technique Erased a Māori Tradition

When European colonizers arrived in the 19th century, they documented the area’s Indigenous inhabitants, but the collodion process served to erase prominent markings known as tā moko, a centuries-old form of tattooing performed by the Māori people. In the wet plate photographs, Tā moko would barely show up.

Source: How a 19th-Century Photographic Technique Erased a Māori Tradition

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