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Showing posts from July, 2018

RACISM: Mustard gas testing

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About This Investigation This is Part 1 of a two-part investigation on mustard gas testing conducted by the U.S. military during World War II. The second story in this report examines failures by the Department of Veterans Affairs to provide benefits to those injured by military mustard gas experiments.

Edwards was one of 60,000 enlisted men enrolled in a once-secret government program — formally declassified in 1993 — to test mustard gas and other chemical agents on American troops. But there was a specific reason he was chosen: Edwards is African-American.

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During the 1950s, the CIA and the U.S. military released half a million mosquitoes with yellow and dengue fever into Black Florida communities, leading to multiple illnesses and deaths. The government wanted to assess the use of mosquitoes as military weapons. Also in that decade, Henrietta Lacks became the first test subject on cloning, without her knowledge or permission, with 20 tons of her cells grown since her …

Using Postwar Americana to Reveal Our Toxic Political Past

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In the chaos of the Trump presidency, Howard Halle's work reminds us that a toxic political atmosphere is nothing new, and that art can help us weather it.
Source: Using Postwar Americana to Reveal Our Toxic Political Past

Anti-colonial Resistance

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For the past 200 years, the Wanaragua masquerade dance has been performed during the Christmas season by the Garifuna — descendants of African and Indigenous Caribbean people — as a festive symbol of anti-colonial resistance.
Source: A 200-Year-Old Dance Celebrates Anti-Colonial Resistance

whitesplaining?

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2016 found a number of white folks giving half-assed apologies for racist behavior.
Source: 5 of the worst whitesplaining excuses for racism

The history of “assimilation” as a racist code word

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For Trump, “assimilation” is a particularly loaded code word. If his goal were truly to promote social cohesion, an immigration policy which privileges those with strong familial ties to current residents would seem an optimal tack. In speaking of assimilation as the ultimate virtue, though, the Trump administration is referring to something else entirely, harkening back to a time when citizenship was contingent upon whiteness. A series of cases from the early 1920s demonstrates what has happened when America has formalized “assimilation” as a legal concept, rather than a loose social construction—it is used to codify special privileges for whites and legitimize abuse toward people of color.
Source: The history of “assimilation” as a racist code word.

How American Racism Influenced Hitler

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Scholars are mapping the international precursors of Nazism.
Source: How American Racism Influenced Hitler | The New Yorker

Race and Racism at Canadian Universities

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The masking of Canada’s identity in a shroud of multiculturalism has created a means to avoid issues of racism and colonialism, creating a system where race-based prejudices exist and continue to fester, but are rarely acknowledged, much less addressed.
Source: Race and Racism at Canadian Universities – AAIHS

Citizen Indians

By the 1890s, white Americans were avid consumers of American Indian cultures. At heavily scripted Wild West shows, Chautauquas, civic pageants, expositions, and fairs, American Indians were most often cast as victims, noble remnants of a vanishing race, or docile candidates for complete assimilation. However, as Lucy Maddox demonstrates in Citizen Indians, some prominent Indian intellectuals of the era―including Gertrude Bonnin, Charles Eastman, and Arthur C. Parker―were able to adapt and reshape the forms of public performance as one means of entering the national conversation and as a core strategy in the pan-tribal reform efforts that paralleled other Progressive-era reform movements. Maddox examines the work of American Indian intellectuals and reformers in the context of the Society of American Indians, which brought together educated, professional Indians in a period when the "Indian question" loomed large. These thinkers belonged to the first generation…

Race, Racism, and Reparations

If affirmative action and other ethnicity-based social programs are justified, then J. Angelo Corlett believes it is important to come to an adequate understanding of the nature of ethnicity in general and ethnic group membership in particular. In Race, Racism, and Reparations, Corlett reconceptualizes traditional ideas of race in terms of ethnicity. As he makes clear, the answers to the questions "What is a Native American"? or "What is a Latino/a"? have important implications for public policy, especially for those programs designed to address historic injustices and economic and social imbalances among different groups in our society.
Having supplanted "race" with a well-defined concept of ethnicity, the author then analyzes the nature and function of racism. Corlett argues for a notion of racism that must encompass not only racist beliefs but also racist actions, omissions, and attempted actions. His aim is to craft a definition of raci…

sexism is the primal, or first, form of oppression in humanity

Sexism is a form of oppression and domination. As author Octavia Butler put it, "Simple peck-order bullying is only the beginning of the kind of hierarchical behavior that can lead to racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, classism, and all the other 'isms' that cause so much suffering in the world."

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Little Man Little Man

White Fragility